Tanya Tanimoto | Wayland Real Estate, Weston Real Estate, Sudbury Real Estate


All houses have character. All houses have personality. Yet, some houses are filled with more history, the type of history that is publicly known and celebrated, than others. Once houses are placed on the national history registry they are rarely, if ever, lived in again.

Living in a history rich house

One such house that is nationally recognized that has been lived in is Biltmore House and Gardens. Some members of the Biltmore family continue to spend time in the house, even if only for a few hours a day, week or month.

The chance to live in a house that's rich with history could come by surprise. You could move into a house and later find out that a famous person once owned the house. Or you might learn that a crime was committed in the house.

Depending on where you reside, you might live in the birth house of a future government leader. An innovative business leader who goes on to develop a worldwide popular product or service might have spent her childhood in the house that you go on to buy.

Let a reporter start digging into this person's past and you could look up and see television cameras posted in your front lawn. Another thing that you might see is pictures of the house highlighted on the Internet. You might even be asked to participate in radio, television or newspaper interviews, sharing personal stories about experiences that you have had since you moved into the house.

Finding houses with history

Agencies that list celebrity homes that are for sale are great resources if you're looking to buy a house with history. Interior designers may also know where celebrity homes in areas that they service are located.

Companies like Zillow also list celebrity real estate directories. Magazines and websites that are geared toward upscale communities and money management also post celebrity homes for sale. If you're simply looking for a house that has lots of history, ask your realtor to tell you about the history of homes that attract you.

Online registries and history sites might have details on whether or not a house was in a historic natural event like a hurricane, earthquake or tornado. Historic registries could also reveal whether or not a house was constructed and lived in during historic events like the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, women's suffrage movement or American Revolution.

To buy and live in some of these homes, you might have to move to another part of the country. For example, you could live in a house that existed during the American Revolution if you move to the Northeast.

Just know that many historic homes, especially houses that were once lived in by a celebrity, are larger and more expensive than an average house. Views that these houses offer can be breathtaking. You also  might land a house that is large enough to comfortably operate a home business out of. Some houses that are loaded with history still have clothes and other belongings once owned and worn by a famous person hanging in the closet or another part of the house. These items can easily drive the value of the house upwards.


You know that your credit score is incredibly important when you want to buy a home. There’s certain things that you could be doing in your everyday life that are hurting your credit score. Here’s what you need to avoid in order to keep your credit score up:


Don’t Allow For Too Many Credit Inquiries


When you’re at the checkout lane at the store, and the clerk informs you that you can save a lot of money if you just open this instant credit card on the spot, that can pose a problem. The issue with this is that the store will be instantly checking your credit score as well. These inquiries hang on your credit report for a certain amount of time. Certain inquiries can also make your score dip. Too many credit inquiries can make lenders suspicious of your ability to be a dependable borrower.



Unpaid Bills Can Add Up


If you forget to pay small credit card bills here and there, it could add up. Think of things like library books, medical bills, and credit card payments. That unreturned library fee that you never paid could come back to haunt you. A medical bill that was sent to collections can become a problem on your credit report. Most of the time, all you need to do is pay these fees up for your score to bounce back. 


Credit Report Errors


Your credit report could have incorrect information about your financial situation and records. Your credit score could be dragged down just because of some errors on the report. If you do find an error on your report, you’ll be able to submit a claim to rectify the error. 


Using Too Much Of Your Available Credit


Just because a credit limit is at $5,000, doesn’t mean that you need to max it out. Even if you pay your bills each month, using too much of your available credit can really harm your score. For your credit score to be calculated and to see how loan worthy you are, your total available credit and how much of that total credit is being used will be put into a formula. Beware of how much of your credit you use in order to keep that score up.


Not Touching Your Credit


You actually need to use your credit in order to build your score. You need credit history in order to have something for loan officers to work with. Accounts that become inactive over time will be closed by default and actually negatively impact your score. 


By using your credit responsibly, you’ll keep your credit score up and be in good shape to buy a house.


>Clothes are our ways of expressing ourselves. The styles we choose whether we like it or not portray an image of who we are to others. We may not think of it but the clothes that line our closet shelves also have an impact on the planet. Energy, resources and the wellbeing of others are all affected by each clothing purchase (and disposal) that we make. Here are a few steps to creating a more eco-conscious closet: Make do and mend - originally a British pamphlet released in World War Two to help housewives practice frugality with clothing, the saying can be easily applied today, not only to lessen an impact on your wallet but the environment too. A great way to start is by learning to sew and/or bring clothes to a tailor to be repaired instead of discarding them when they develop holes or lose buttons. Clean the closet - keep a smaller amount of clothes in your wardrobe. Most of us have very large wardrobes but only wear a very small percentage of them in our day to day lives. Take note of the clothing pieces you reach for time and time again and which fall to the back of the drawer. If you haven’t worn a piece in over a year, it’s likely it won’t be missed if donated for someone else to make better use of it. Create a wardrobe with vision - we live in a culture of instant gratification, one where we can go out and buy what we want from the store at a cheap price and bring it home to sit in the back of our closets for months or even years without ever being worn. The next time you go shopping ask yourself if a piece fits in with the majority of your wardrobe and can be used optimally. Creating a checklist of qualifications an item should have before adding it to your shopping bag is a great way to ensure your purchases are smart ones. Second-hand shopping - a great way to keep more clothes out of a landfill is to shop secondhand stores for items on your wishlist. While there is a bit of a hunt involved it will be well worth your time. Look for quality pieces that will last you years to come with proper care. You might be surprised to find some of the labels you may not normally be able to obtain sitting amongst the racks of your local thrift store. Wash less often - unless they are your gym clothes or you work outside there is little reason to wash shirts and pants after every wash. Not only will washing less prolong the lifespan of a clothing piece but it will also save on water and energy over time. Avoid dry cleaning - dry cleaning involves chemicals that are not only bad for the environment but people too. When shopping leave clothes that require dry cleaning on the store racks. If you really must have a piece that is dry-cleaning only seek out a dry cleaner that uses environmentally friendly process over the traditional chemical laden one. Smart purchase - when it’s time to replace your washer and dryer look for low energy appliances that are Energy Star certified. This upgrade is also beneficial to you as you can usually get tax credits for doing so. By keeping a cohesive wardrobe with fewer pieces that you wash less often and mend when they need repairing you will shrink your carbon footprint and keep more money in your wallet and I think that’s something we can all feel good about!

If you recently purchased a home in a new city or town, you may need to act quickly to ensure cable services are installed immediately following your move. Lucky for you, we're here to help you assess cable services providers so that you can find one that exceeds your expectations.

Now, let's take a look at three best practices as you evaluate cable services providers.

1. Think About the Services That You Will Need

Many cable services providers are available, and no two services providers are exactly alike. As such, you'll want to examine which cable services that you need, along with which services that you can live without.

For example, a hardcore football fan likely will need a cable services package that makes it easy to watch plenty of pigskin action. On the other hand, a political news follower may want a cable services package that delivers up-to-the-minute Capitol Hill news coverage.

Ask each cable services provider about the packages that it provides, along with which channels are included in each package. That way, you'll be better equipped than ever before to make an informed cable services purchase decision.

2. Consider Your Budget

Cable services packages may vary from basic packages that include a handful of channels to complete bundles that feature thousands of channels. Meanwhile, cable services providers offer packages at different price points, and you'll want to find a package that guarantees you won't have to break your monthly budget to afford cable services.

In some instances, cable services providers offer discounts to customers who sign multi-year agreements. Keep in mind, however, that if you sign a multi-year agreement, you're committed to the terms of this pact for a few years. And if you need to break the agreement, you may be hit with a cancellation fee.

Furthermore, many cable services providers offer internet and phone services. If you decide to combine your cable services with internet and phone offerings, you may be able to receive a discounted bundle rate.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

Separating one cable services provider from another can be difficult, particularly for those with limited time and resources at their disposal. If you collaborate with a real estate agent, you can gain expert insights into different cable services companies and boost your chances of making the best possible selection.

A real estate agent is happy to connect you with top cable services providers in various cities and towns. By doing so, this housing market professional can ensure you can seamlessly set up cable services at any address, at any time.

Let's not forget about the support that a real estate agent can provide throughout the homebuying journey, either. A real estate agent can schedule home showings, negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf and much more.

There is no need to worry about getting the best cable services at your new home. Use the aforementioned best practices, and you can should have no trouble finding a top-notch cable services provider prior to moving day.


The variety of candles on the market has never been greater. When it comes to shopping for candles, however, a bigger selection isn't always a good thing. Many of us have, at one time or another, come down with a case of option paralysis looking at a wall full of Yankee Candles. Aside from choosing a fragrance, there are several other options to consider. Which candles burn the longest? Which type of wax works best? And, unfortunately, now we must even find out which candles are safe for us to inhale. Types of Candle Wax There are three main types of wax widely available in stores today: paraffin, soy, and beeswax. Each type has its ups and downs, but we'll break them down so you can choose one that's right for you.
  • Beeswax - This type of wax comes straight from the hive, making it a safe and natural wax to burn in your home. It also burns for the longest duration of the three types of wax, which is good because it can be pricey. It's great for lighting a room and burns as a bright white color. But, if you spill it walking to the fusebox during a power outage good luck getting that sticky beeswax out of your carpet. Also, beeswax candles do not mix well with added fragrances, so the selection will be narrow.
  • Paraffin - If beeswax is the natural, healthy choice for candles then paraffin is the processed, junkfood option.  Paraffin candles can be very affordable, but the cheap price tag comes at the cost of additives and artificial fragrances that you might not want to breathe in. Paraffin also tends to burn quickly, so if your candles aren't just for show you might find yourself spending a lot on them anyway. One benefit of paraffin is that it combines easily with fragrances so there is a great variety of scents available.
  • Soy - Perhaps a good in-between choice for candle lovers is the soy candle. Since they're made from soybeans, soy candles are a sustainable, biodegradable option. Spilled wax cleans up fairly easily, and soy combines well with other fragrances, so there are a great variety of scented candles available on the market. Soy wax is soft, however, which means you won't find many candles that aren't in jars that you could pop into your favorite candle holder.
Types of Wicks Wire, cotton, and wood, oh wow... Who knew there were so many types of wicks out there?  You can find all of these options in stores, but which one is right for you?
  • Wire wicks - These wicks have a metal zinc core that sits straight in a candle and burns evenly. The idea of burning a metal wick doesn't seem safe, but they are harmless and do not emit dangerous gases into the air.
  • Cotton wicks - The most common wicks on the market are made from cotton. They're cheap to produce and are often braided, which looks nice. They can sometimes burn unevenly, though, and require trimming.
  • Wooden wicks - The new wick on the block. These fit in with the rustic look that many homeowners are now going for. To further that point, there are also crackling wood wicks that emit either a pleasing or distracting crackling noise while they burn. You probably won't need to trim these wicks, but they are often used in higher-end candles, so expect to pay more.



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